Aviation Collection

This page includes a few of the items that I have in my Canadian Military Aviation Collection. The collection includes a variety of artifacts including flight helmets and flight gear, aircraft parts, manuals, camera's and much more.

The items on this page are not for sale. See my ads on Craigslist for surplus items that I am selling

If you have any questions or comments about an item you see in the collection, or have something that you think I may be interested in, please contact me.


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Type B Flying Helmet

Issued to RAF and Commonwealth flight crews between 1936 to 1941, this type of flying helmet was the type used by RAF fighter pilots during the Battle of Britain.

The helmet is made from dark leather, with a cotton layer of padding and was lined with chamois. The chin strap is leather with a Bennett buckle. The helmets were not made to hold communications equipment but the domed leather ear cups could accommodate Gosport tubes or radio receivers. The two metal snaps fasteners on the side were to hold the oxygen mask, the Type B helmet was designed for the Type D oxygen mask but could be modified to fit other types of masks. The Type B helmet came in four different sizes.

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Type B Flying Helmet - Canadian

This leather flying helmet is another example of a Canadian Type B helmet with the earcups with the rubber insert pads. This of helmet was used by British Commonwealth Air Training Plan (BCATP) pilots and flight crews training in Canada.

The Canadian made B-type differed from the RAF version having a different cut of leather panels, a different strap arrangement with pronged chrome plated buckle type fasteners and, was made of softer, lighter coloured leather.

Currently I have this helmet on display with a pair of RCAF MKIII goggles and a gosport tube.

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Type C Flying Helmet - First Pattern

Issued in 1941, the first pattern Type C helmet was made from dark brown leather, was lined with chamois and included an elasticized back and a leather chin strap with a Bennett buckle. The radio receiver housings were made of moulded rubber, the first pattern C Type helmet did not include wiring for communication and an external wiring harness was used.

The early first pattern C Type helmets were designed to use the Type E masks and have two snaps on the side, later versions were used the E* mask and had three snaps. Straps with fastening snaps on the both sides of the ear cups were to hold the goggle straps in place and were specifically designed to accommodate the Mk IV series of goggles.

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Type E Flying Helmet - Second Pattern

Introduced in 1945, like the first pattern, the second pattern Type E "Tropical" helmet used an unlined cotton "Airtex" material. It differed from the first pattern Type E helmet in that it was internally wired and incorporated improvements seen on the later Type C helmets such as the elastic chin strap and the ommission of the goggle straps on the upper front sides of the helmet. It was used in service until the late 1950s.

This helmet is equipped with earphone receiver 10A/12401, connector type 2091 and a black cased bell jack/plug 10H/1099. The helmet is displayed with a 1945 Type H oxygen mask, high altitude hose and post WWII MK8 goggle and represents what was worn by early RCAF Vampire pilots.

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Gentex DH-411 - Early Version

Gentex DH-411 helmet was the standard issue flight helmet for RCAF/CAF pilots and flight crews from the early 1960's until the 1990's. It was used by helicopter, transport, tactical and training pilots and flight crews.

The early DH-411 helmet included a single visor housed in a hard protective cover and was available with tinted or clear shades that could be raised and lowered by loosing/turning the single knob and sliding the visor to the desired position along the track where the knob was turned to tighten the lens and would lock into place. The helmet could was equipped with a boom microphone mounted to an ear cup and could accommodate an oxygen mask if necessary.

This helmet is a early example of the DH-411 helmet that was converted in service from a DH-41-2 helmet. The label on the inside reads: Helmet: Aircrew Type DH41-2, 15G/8/8475/21/801/9840, Medium, Jan 1962.

The helmet has yellow reflective tape on it, with a sticker from the 450 Squadron, another sticker that says "We Deliver" and the name Cpl. Bystrom. For more information on the RCAF 450 Tactical Helicopter Squadron, visit their website.

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Gentex DH-411 (DH-41-1)

Gentex DH-411 helmet was the standard issue flight helmet for RCAF/CAF pilots and flight crews from the early 1960's until the 1990's. It was used by helicopter, transport, tactical and training pilots and flight crews.

The DH-411 includes a single visor housed in a hard protective cover. The visor which was available in three tinted shades could be raised and lowered by pulling out the single knob and sliding the visor to the desired position along the track which would lock into place when released. The helmet could also be equipped with a boom microphone mounted to an ear cup.

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Gentex H-4-1

The Canadian Gentex H-4-1 helmet is constructed of fiberglass with webbing and ear pads on the inside. The helmet has a separate an inner cloth helmet which contains the communications cord and earphones and has a MS22001 oxygen mask with microphone. This type of helmet was used by Royal Canadian Air Force pilots flying F-86, CF-100, Vampires, CT-133's and P-51D's. The Royal Canadian Navy pilots flying F2H-3 Banshee and Hawker Sea Fury would have worn the same type of helmet.

This helmet is from the 442 'City of Vancouver' (F) Squadron (Auxiliary) at Sea Island (Aux) during the mid-1950. Stores label 22C/5097/1733, size large.

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Gentex DH-41-2

Designed for use in high performance jet fighters like the CF-101 Voodoo and the CF-104 Starfighter in use by the RCAF. This helmet is an original RCAF survivor and is complete with its original MS22001 oxygen mask, Pate retention system, comms, liner and visor.

The label in the helmet included the follow information. Helmet: Aircraft DH-41-2, 15G/8/8475-21-801-9840, Size: Medium, Date: 1/65, Gentex Corp., Carbondale, PA., 2GA4-240

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Gentex DH-41-2

The DH 41-2 helmet was designed to provide better vision, facial protection and sound dampening for the pilot. The design provided better protection for head during in flight buffeting, ejections and bailouts and crash landings. The design distributed the impact forces over the entire head by the webbing outer shell suspension systems better absorbing forces and minimizing impact on the pilots head. The DH 41-2 helmet had two individually controlled visors, one clear and one tinted and used a microphone equipped oxygen mask.

This helmet is original and complete with the MS22001 oxygen mask, helmet bag, dog tags with chain, dosimeter, Aircraft Support Equipment Record Set for the helmet, two sets of gloves and even some new earplugs in a container. The helmet was accepted at Comox August 1980 so it's possible it was with the 409 Squadron flying the CF-101 Voodoo.

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Gentex DH-41-2

The last issue of the Gentex DH-41-2 helmet used by the Canadian Armed Forces featured newer liner assembly with exposed, contoured ear cups. The MS22001 oxygen mask on this helmet featured a different retention system, much like the Hardman retention system used by the US military.

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Gentex 190A

First introduced in the mid-1980's the Gentex 190 helmet was introduced to the Canadian Armed forces for use in the McDonnell Douglas CF-188 Hornet aircraft. The Gentex 190A was an improved version of the 190 with improvements of material, weight reduction including the removal of dual hard visor assembly, guides, knobs and improved mounting of the MBU-12/P oxygen mask.

Components of the helmet include a fibreglass outer shell, energy absorbing liner, thermoplastic liner, snap on dual visor assembly, nape-chin strap, ear cup, pile liner and fitting pads.

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MS22001 Oxygen Mask

MS22001 O2 mask with Pate II suspension system.

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Gentex MBU-20/P Oxygen Mask

RCAF 426 Squadron "Thunderbirds" Flight Suit

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This flight suit is from the RCAF 426 Squadron and includes the squadron crest, Canada shoulder flash, navigator wings and epaulettes.

The suit was likely used when the squadron was based out of Trenton Ontario or Saint-Hubert Quebec when they flew the Canadair C-5 North Star. The North Star retired from RCAF the service December 1965. 426 disbanded at Saint-Hubert on September 1 1962 but was later reformed May 3 1971 at CFB Uplands Ottawa.

Canadian Armed Forces 414 Squadron Flight Suit

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This flight suit is from a pilot with the Canadian Armed Forces / Air Force 414 Combat Support Squadron flying the CT-133 Silver Star (Canadair built version of the Lockheed T-33).

RCAF/Canadian Armed Forces Patches

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Irvin Flying Jacket

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This jacket is a 1939 (possible 1940) vintage Irvin Flying Jacket manufactured by Calman Links. This jacket has the 2 panel back with the DOT on the zippers. On the label inside the jacket is the A.M. (Air Ministry) logo, 750/C.I. 38 (size) and handwritten initials DR.

Originally designed by the parachute pioneer Leslie Leroy Irvin, the Irvin sheepskin flying jacket would become the standard issue to R.A.F. and Commonwealth aircrews during WWII. Pre-war jackets were manufactured with an undivided one piece panel requiring only the minimum number of seams which was easier to assemble, but consumed greater quantities of material.

With the demand for higher quantities of jackets, a more economic method of manufacture was developed which had the pattern divided into smaller panels therefore allowing for savings in material, but increased number of seams. Also, due to the high demand for the jacket, manufacture was sub-contracted to other companies, which is why there are variations of the design and colour. The first examples went into production in 1931.

Because most heavy bombing raids took place around 30,000ft where the temperatures could reach -50C, a warm flight jacket was a necessary part of equipment.

Canadian Snowbirds Flight Demonstration 1975/76 Team Jacket

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Snowbirds jacket from Major Denis Gauthier the leader of the Canadian Armed Forces Snowbirds Air Demonstration team in 1975 and 1976. Major Gauthier was a fighter pilot and a member of the Canadian Armed Forces for 37 years and retired at the rank of Lieutenant Colonel.

Flight Lieutenant Gauthier was also with the 1967 Golden Centennaires team as the commentator.

For more information on the Canadian Forces Snowbirds, 431 Squadron, see thier website at www.rcaf-arc.forces.gc.ca/en/snowbirds/index.page.

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B-8 Goggles

Manufactured by the Polariod Corporation
The B-8 goggle was standardized in 1944, making the AN-6530 obsolete.
This type by Polaroid came with a set of different colored lenses to use during changing weather conditions.
Goggles comprising a single eyepiece mounted in a flexible black rubber frame, with elastic olive fabric strap.

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Bendix Altimeter

Bendix Corporation Altimeter, dated August 1971. This is an ex-RCAF altimeter and was used in the Lockheed / Canadair CF-104 Starfighter, de Havilland Canada CC-115 Buffalo (DHC-5) and the Lockheed CC-130E Hercules.

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Canadair F-86 Sabre Throttle

Throttle from a Canadair F-86 / CL-13 Sabre which is a licence built version of the North American Aviation F-86 Sabre jet fighter.

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Canadair CT-133 Silverstar Dataplate

Dataplate from a Canadair built CL-30 / CT-133 Silver Star (licence built version of the Lockheed T-33). Removed from CT-133 21495. 495 last served with the Royal Canadian Navy VX10, was written off June 21 1968 and was scrapped.

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Canadair CT-133 Silverstar Grip

B-8A stick grip from a Canadair built CL-30 / CT-133 Silver Star (licence built version of the Lockheed T-33).

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Canadair CT-114 Tutor Throttle

Throttle from a Canadair CL-41A / CT-114 Tutor jet trainer. This throttle is from the left side of the cockpit. Designed in the late 1950's and first flew January 1960, the CT-114 Tutor was the primary jet trainer for the Canadian Air Force until 2000. Now retired from its original role, some Tutors have been retained by the RCAF to operate with the RCAF Snowbirds Flight Demonstration team and for flight test purposes.

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de Havilland Aircraft of Canada Control Yoke

Co-pilot control yoke from a de Havilland Aircraft of Canada DHC-5 / CC-115 Buffalo. This style of yoke was used on other DHC aircraft such as the DHC-4 / CC-108 Caribou.

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Lockheed C-130 Hercules Control Yoke Cap

Part#: 356924-5 E, USRC 3501, dated September 1966.

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McDonnell CF-101 Voodoo Pilots Instrument Panel

Removed from the Canadian Armed Forces CF-101B Voodoo #101015, Voodoo 101015 in an ex-USAF s/n 57-299 F-101B-85-MC transferred to MASDC (Military Aircraft Storage and Disposition Center) on July 14 1968. Transferred to the Canadian Armed Forces September 21 1971 as 101015. 101015 served with the No.409 All Weather Squadron at CFB Comox and the No. 425 All Weather Squadron CFB Bagotville Quebec. Struck off strength October 20 1989 in 1995 Voodoo 101015 was put on static display at Veterans Memorial Park, Levis Quebec.

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McDonnell CF-101 Voodoo 416 Squadron Patch

The squadron patch which is 32 inches in diameter, was cut off the tail of McDonnell CF-101 Voodoo number 101010. This Voodoo was ex-USAF s/n 57-286, F-101B-85-MC, taken on strength by the RCAF on July 2nd 1970. Served with No. 409 All Weather Fighter Squadron CFB Comox, BC and with No. 416 Squadron.

While being transported under a Chinook helicopter from CFB Mountain View to the RCAF Museum at CFB Trenton, it was jettisoned due to severe oscillations (photo) and landed upside down in Bay of Quinte. It was recovered but because it was badly damaged, it was scrapped.

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McDonnell CF-101 Voodoo Nose

Nose cone from a Canadian Armed Forces CF-101 Voodoo. I'm looking for a pitot tube for it if anyone has one.

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K-20 Aerial Camera

Folmer Grayflex model K-20, serial no. AC-42-70952

The K-20 camera is a lightweight, handheld, aerial camera used for oblique photography during World War II (between 1941 and 1946).

The K-20 was made under contract for the military during WWII by Graflex and several other companies. Approximately 15,000 were manufactured by Folmer Graflex Corp. in Rochester, NY between 1941-1945. They use a 5.25"x20 to 5.25"x200 foot roll film, with an image size of 4x5 inches. The lenses were non interchangeable 6 3/8" f/4.5 adjustable diaphragm made by Kodak, Ilex, or Bausch & Lomb, depending on what was available at time of order. After WWII many of the K-20 cameras were destroyed so that the market would not be flooded with the cameras after the war had ended and they were sold to the civilian market.

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Type G45 Gun Camera

Williamson Mfg. Co. Ltd. London & Reading model G45, serial no. 15463

The G45 gun camera was used throughout WWII by British fighter units and armament schools from 1939 onwards. It was designed and manufactured by the Williamson company of London and Reading. It used 16 mm orthochromatic film supplied in 25 ft lengths with a frame speed of 16, 18 or 20 per second, these corresponding to the rates of fire of the Lewis, Vickers K and Browning machine guns. The G45 was fitted as standard on Fighter Command aircraft such as the Spitfire and Hurricane. It was controlled by an electrical switch operated by the gun-firing pneumatic system.

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Vertol H21A and H-21B Helicopters Manual

Description and Maintenance Instructions
Royal Canadian Air Force

Issued on Authority of the Chief of the Air Staff
EO 05-80A-2 (Replaces EO 05-80A-2 Dated Feb 56)
April 1 1957

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Expeditor 3 Operating Instructions

3T, 3TM, 3N,3NM

Royal Canadian Air Force

Aircraft Operating Instructions
E.O 05-45B-1
June 1 1960

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Beech Musketeer CT 134A Operating Instructions

National Defence
Canadian Forces Technical Order

Aircraft Operating Instructions

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RCAF Description and Maintenance Instructions - Tutor

EO 05-195A-2A

Full Title: Royal Canadian Air Force, Description and Maintenance Instructions, Airframe Group, Tutor

Issued on authority of the Chief of the Defence Staff
March 12 1964, revised February 16 1966

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de Havilland Canada CC 138 Twin Otter Training Manual

Course Training Manual for the CC 138 Twin Otter Airframe Tech 512.40
426 (T) Training Squadron

May 1974

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de Havilland Canada DHC-7 Series 100 Specifications

Detail Specifications
AEROC 7.1.G.3 Issue 3

Manual: The de Havilland Aircraft of Canada, Limited. Downsview Ontario Canada

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Aircraft Photograph Collection

See some of the vintage photos from the collection. These photos show a variety of aircraft, mostly Canadian, including military, civil and commercial aircraft from various eras. All photos are scans from photographs, slides, prints or negatives.

The collection is hosted on Flickr.